Daniel Motolop Interview AgriAdventures

Daniel Motlop Interview – Something Wild Aboriginal Food

Speaker 1 (00:00):

[foreign language 00:00:00] Okay, now let’s switch on English so everybody can understand and gonna tell what I was saying. So, um, the, the radio, the Adventures on the Radio Italiana Adelaide is a radio program that speaks about food, agriculture, and they are applied to hospitality and tourism. So, generally, the topics that they like to speak about is connected with agriculture, and the communication of food on the, on the radio. And, uh, I was saying to our friends who also are following us from the Facebook page, uh, a little bit about you. So, Daniel Motlop. Motlop?

Daniel Motlop (06:36):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (06:37):

Is that correct?

Daniel Motlop (06:37):

Motlop. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (06:38):

Motlop. Perfect sorry. Because between how it’s spelled and always written, there’s a lot of difference, but, uh, I would like actually to see how it’s written in, if there is a, a writing way in, in, uh, in Aboriginal, like, I don’t know.

Daniel Motlop (06:51):

No, that, that is it. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (06:53):

Is that correct?

Daniel Motlop (06:53):

M-O M-O-T-L-O-P. yep. That’s how it’s spelled.

Speaker 1 (06:56):

Oh, this is correct?

Daniel Motlop (06:57):

Yep, yep.

Speaker 1 (06:57):

This is wrong.

Daniel Motlop (06:58):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (06:59):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (06:59):

Yeah. Yep.

Speaker 1 (07:00):

Okay. Lovely. Perfect. I love it.

Daniel Motlop (07:02):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (07:02):

(laughs) I love it.

Daniel Motlop (07:02):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (07:03):

Okay. And, um, so, uh, first I have to apologize, because, uh, um, the la- the first newsletter I sent out, uh, from the website, uh, from the AgriAdventures, uh, website, the booking platform, I, I’ve been writing… The, the name of the mail was about original experience.

Daniel Motlop (07:25):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (07:25):

But I spelled it wrong.

Daniel Motlop (07:27):

Okay. No. That’s all right.

Speaker 1 (07:28):

So, because aboriginal-

Daniel Motlop (07:28):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (07:30):

… in Italian, it’s read, uh, like, uh, it’s spelled with a, with a E.

Daniel Motlop (07:36):

Oh, with an E. Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1 (07:37):

Yeah.

Daniel Motlop (07:37):

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (07:37):

So, uh, I, I wrote it down and then I had people calling and saying, oh my God, you’ve been spelling wrong when you first…

Daniel Motlop (07:43):

(laughs)

Speaker 1 (07:44):

So, I apologize.

Daniel Motlop (07:46):

No, no, no.

Speaker 1 (07:47):

Good to know that is spelled differently here in English, anyway. So, Daniel, I’m super happy because I tell you, I came the first time in Australia-

Daniel Motlop (07:58):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (07:58):

… in 2009. And, uh, I was looking to understand the culture.

Daniel Motlop (08:04):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (08:05):

But I had a lot of struggle to get in contact with the culture.

Daniel Motlop (08:10):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (08:11):

Uh, because maybe my mistake, which was, I was judging more of what I was seeing.

Daniel Motlop (08:16):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (08:16):

So, uh, I always found guilty, because if, like, as a traveler, I’ve been traveling all over the planet and I’ve been visiting different cultures, you know, to me was the key, meet the local and understand-

Daniel Motlop (08:29):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (08:30):

… more about their story, the experience and everything. So, for me today is a sort of, I’ve done it. Finally I can understand-

Daniel Motlop (08:37):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (08:37):

… a little bit, and I-

Daniel Motlop (08:37):

Teach you a little bit more today-

Speaker 1 (08:39):

Yes. And I wanna open it, because-

Daniel Motlop (08:42):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (08:42):

… I believe that everyone, everybody that’s following us, uh, on YouTube channel, and on the radio, and all the other channels about users, they need to get this connection.

Daniel Motlop (08:53):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (08:54):

Because it is, it’s beautiful, I think. So, uh, would you like to tell us a little bit about your story-

Daniel Motlop (09:00):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (09:01):

… like your, your yourself?

Daniel Motlop (09:02):

Yeah. So, um, my, my country, so with- within Australia, there’s obviously 500 different Aboriginal languages. Um, so we call ’em 500 different, um, countries. Um, within my area it’s called Larrakia.

Speaker 1 (09:18):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (09:18):

Um, so Larrakia is a small, uh, part of the Northern Territory up top of Australia.

Speaker 1 (09:24):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (09:24):

Um, and it, it’s, it’s made up of, uh, 16 families. Um, basically, um, within 200, 300 kilometers of that there’s another country as well that we call-

Speaker 1 (09:36):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (09:37):

… that’s um, obviously another certain tribe. So, all those tribes around Australia are made up of 500 different languages.

Speaker 1 (09:44):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (09:44):

Um, so they’re all different. We all speak different bit like the Italian culture, I suppose.

Speaker 1 (09:49):

Yeah. [foreign language 00:09:49] Yeah.

Daniel Motlop (09:49):

Calabrese and all that sort of side of thing, I suppose. So, um, it’s very, very complex, uh, system. Um, but basically I’m a Aboriginal Torres Strait Island man.

Speaker 1 (09:57):

Hmm.

Daniel Motlop (09:59):

Uh, Torres Strait Island from the top of Queensland of Australia.

Speaker 1 (10:03):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (10:04):

Um, a bunch of little islands, um, where certain, um, people live, so, um, called Torres Strait Islands. Um, my grandfather moved from there when he was very young and moved across to, to Darwin-

Speaker 1 (10:15):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (10:16):

… um, or Larrakia country and, and met my grandmother. So, basically that’s how I become Larrakia-

Speaker 1 (10:22):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (10:22):

… um, Torres Islander.

Speaker 1 (10:23):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (10:24):

Um, yeah. So, yeah, I’m f- I’m all the way from up there. And I started my journey, um, I suppose, through food and footy, um, uh, Aussie rules that is-

Speaker 1 (10:35):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (10:36):

… um, not so much football and soccer, the soccer ball, but, um, Aussie rules, we were called in Australia. Um-

Speaker 1 (10:42):

And why did you decide to play like that?

Daniel Motlop (10:44):

Um, I suppose, um, as a kid, you know, you, you, your uncles played it and, and all your family. So, I, I was 16, done all my schooling in Darwin and got to an age, uh, where I wanted to move away and, and go to school down here in Adelaide.

Speaker 1 (10:58):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (10:58):

Uh, moved away when I was 16 and, and started a professional footy career, um, playing, playing in the AFL. Uh, spent 12 years playing professional, um, AFL footy. And then after retirement, I started a, a small business, um, called Something Wild.

Speaker 1 (11:14):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (11:14):

Basically selling, um, and showcasing native ingredients to Australia. Um, yeah, Australian native ingredients probably haven’t been showcased and obviously the European, um, influence through Australia, you know, with your farms and that sort of stuff. And, you know, growing potatoes, growing carrots and all of this, this thing, um, has probably taken over what, um, you know, Aboriginal people used to farm-

Speaker 1 (11:39):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (11:39):

… a long time ago.

Speaker 1 (11:40):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (11:40):

So, basically with Something Wild, we try to, um, put fresh, um, fruits, and berries, and nuts and greens, um, that are native to Australia, um, in our central market store-

Speaker 1 (11:52):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (11:52):

… uh, and sell it that way.

Speaker 1 (11:54):

Okay. So, well, first thing I say that, like, in my opinion, being professional hospitality and, uh, being also Italian, I always found a strong connection between what is food and what is culture.

Daniel Motlop (12:05):

Mm-hmm.

Speaker 1 (12:06):

And one of the strong things that I’ve seen in exchange, uh, in consideration of food was that food helps to open cultures.

Daniel Motlop (12:15):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (12:16):

Because like Italian culture, now, sometimes is obviously, uh, reinvented all over the planet, but there is a strong connection with food. And because of that, you can find, uh, the, the Italian culture all over the planet, even though maybe it’s not made from Italians.

Daniel Motlop (12:32):

Yep. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (12:32):

So, the, the, the fact that you’ve been connecting and creating these opportunity from not, uh, Aboriginal people, to taste, uh, uh, and experience your product, I believe is a way to open the cultures.

Daniel Motlop (12:48):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (12:49):

Because, uh, um, until, as I said, you judge by the eyes. You maybe can be, uh, shocked or surprised from the look of things.

Daniel Motlop (12:58):

Mm-hmm.

Speaker 1 (12:59):

But when you use your palette-

Daniel Motlop (13:00):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (13:00):

… things are changing.

Daniel Motlop (13:02):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (13:03):

It is not looking anymore. It’s just something different. So…

Daniel Motlop (13:05):

Yep. Yep. Yeah. But basically, um, uh, our, our food is part of our culture as well. Um, uh, as you said, um, you know, there, there’s things that I can’t eat that, that are culturally significant to us, um, which is the crocodile.

Speaker 1 (13:19):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (13:20):

Um, crocodile is, is a God to us, I suppose, or to my people-

Speaker 1 (13:25):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (13:25):

… where I’m from. So, we basically don’t eat crocodile.

Speaker 1 (13:27):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (13:27):

But there’s other things that we can eat. So, um, there’s other tribes that can’t eat a stingray or can’t eat, um, a certain fish, or, or things like that. And that’s basic, basically around sustainabi- sustainability stuff as well.

Speaker 1 (13:41):

Mm-hmm. Okay.

Daniel Motlop (13:42):

Um, if everyone eats one thing, then obviously you’re gonna, um, put a bit of stress on the, on the land and, and that sort of stuff too.

Speaker 1 (13:47):

Oh yeah, of course. Of course.

Daniel Motlop (13:49):

So, everything… Basically in, in our culture, um, there, there’s a system that we go by, which is called the moiety system. It, it’s a Latin, Latin word full of half.

Speaker 1 (14:00):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (14:01):

Um, so everything you walk through, the land, um, the stars, the skies, the sun, um, to people, to the animals is either one or the other. [foreign language 00:14:11] we call it.

Speaker 1 (14:12):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (14:13):

So, it’s basically a circle split in half, and you are separated between, so eight clans will be Yirritja clans-

Speaker 1 (14:20):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (14:20):

… and eight clans will be Dhuwa clans. And that, that tells you who you can marry into as well. So, Yirritja people have to marry Dhuwa people, and Dhuwa have to marry Yirritja.

Speaker 1 (14:29):

Okay. That’s-

Daniel Motlop (14:30):

Um-

Speaker 1 (14:30):

… interesting. So-

Daniel Motlop (14:31):

And the same with all the plants. So, um, a pandanus tree, you know, a Yirritja tree, um, a paperbark tree, Dhuwa. An animal, a crocodile Yirritja.

Speaker 1 (14:40):

Uh-huh.

Daniel Motlop (14:41):

Uh, and then, yeah, so, so on. So, like everything is either Yirritja or Dhuwa.

Speaker 1 (14:44):

So-

Daniel Motlop (14:44):

And that decides on where we are as family, kinship, law and everything, Aboriginal law. So…

Speaker 1 (14:51):

Aboriginal law. So, just to understand this, it was, uh, so it was created between the different Aboriginal country, is that correct?

Daniel Motlop (15:00):

This is, yeah.

Speaker 1 (15:00):

All the-

Daniel Motlop (15:01):

60, yeah, 60,000 years old. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (15:02):

So, it’s something that came through the, in the, in generations and the generations.

Daniel Motlop (15:07):

It has been passed. Yeah. Through song, through dance. So, we basically… Aboriginal people didn’t write or anything-

Speaker 1 (15:12):

Yeah. True.

Daniel Motlop (15:12):

… like that, they danced. So, they danced these stories, uh, and, uh, it’s much easier to pass a dance on than it is to learn how to write and read.

Speaker 1 (15:21):

Oh yeah, absolutely.

Daniel Motlop (15:22):

Um, but, you know, uh, all our histories on walls or rock art, um, and in our song lines, which is a dance and stuff like that, so…

Speaker 1 (15:30):

Okay. So, is, um, like I was trying to, to, to get and, uh, elaborate the concept, because, uh, obviously for us, it, it’s a bit different, but it has sense if you see from a different point of view, which is that people have been learning on the time of leaving that you are from this specific spot-

Daniel Motlop (15:50):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (15:50):

… and you don’t do, uh, these things because these things will damage you or will-

Daniel Motlop (15:56):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (15:56):

… damage the place where you live.

Daniel Motlop (15:57):

The culture. Yeah. That, basically, yeah.

Speaker 1 (15:59):

And that is gonna be the culture, because the reality, if I understand, well, Aboriginal they were also coun- their culture is also their country.

Daniel Motlop (16:06):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (16:07):

So, the culture is what you are, which means the environment, which is, is-

Daniel Motlop (16:10):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (16:10):

… also culture. Is the correct?

Daniel Motlop (16:11):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (16:12):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (16:12):

We come, we come third… People come third.

Speaker 1 (16:16):

Come third?

Daniel Motlop (16:16):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (16:17):

Yeah. Well, that gives us a lot of sense. So- (laughs)

Daniel Motlop (16:20):

After the animals and after the country-

Speaker 1 (16:21):

That’s-

Daniel Motlop (16:21):

… and then that’s people.

Speaker 1 (16:22):

… perfect. Uh, that is, this is a beautiful sentence. And, um, the, um, because like one of the other interviews that I’ve done was, uh, with, uh, um, uh, Ben Paxton, which is a wine, has a winery-

Daniel Motlop (16:38):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (16:38):

… um, in McLaren Vale. And they work, uh, in biodynamic, biodynamic regime. And biodynamic was, uh, created as philosophy from, uh, Rudolph Steiner was, uh, uh, anthropophi- anthroposophist, uh, from Austria-

Daniel Motlop (16:56):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (16:57):

… that has, uh, done and created this sort of, uh, lifestyle, which is not just considering what you wanna eat now, but is also the relationship within the stars, between the energy, how the energy move and the environment.

Daniel Motlop (17:14):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (17:14):

And, um, and that was not coming from just him. He was just collecting the information they were coming from the old generations of farmers-

Daniel Motlop (17:24):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (17:24):

… back in Europe.

Daniel Motlop (17:24):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (17:25):

So, like, there is a concept of having the horn and filling a horn with some specific ingredients, living the horn aging-

Daniel Motlop (17:33):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (17:33):

… under the ground.

Daniel Motlop (17:35):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (17:35):

So, it’s so interesting because you’ve been speaking of something that has a connection, in my opinion, all over on the planet.

Daniel Motlop (17:43):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (17:43):

I think they, even the, the Indian from, uh, America-

Daniel Motlop (17:47):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (17:47):

… they had similar concepts.

Daniel Motlop (17:50):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (17:50):

Which, so it is really cool. And, uh, these are all, uh, like, uh, biodynamic. It was something in my mom in Bulga- uh, now she’s in Bulgaria, but biodynamic was, um, for, uh, a way to be respectful for the planet. So, when she was growing food, she was trying to make this connection stars. And-

Daniel Motlop (18:10):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (18:11):

… and, um, so I’m around this thing for like 35 years.

Daniel Motlop (18:15):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (18:15):

And, uh, now that with the problems that we are seeing coming with the environment-

Daniel Motlop (18:20):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (18:20):

… and sustainability, the, this kind of, uh, agriculture way, they are getting kind of relevant.

Daniel Motlop (18:28):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (18:28):

Because we can’t keep going using, you know, agrichemicals, and deforestation and just spread down, put seed-

Daniel Motlop (18:36):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (18:36):

… put some chemicals and go.

Daniel Motlop (18:37):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (18:37):

Because-

Daniel Motlop (18:39):

That’s, that’s why these, these native ingredients that we harvest, um, you know, you does, you don’t need to water ’em. Um, you don’t need to set up sprinklers systems. You don’t have to, you know, put fertilizer down. None of this stuff. Uh, all the stuff that we sell in our shop is, it’s, it’s organic, I suppose, uh, and wild harvesting. So, yeah, it’s probably the… It is the way a lot more people are going. And even with the food that we sell in our shop, you know, your, your E- your EMU, your kangaroo-

Speaker 1 (19:08):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (19:09):

… uh, your Buffalo, your wild boar um, those, those are things that have been ins- you know, the wild boar and Buffalo, um, and camel-

Speaker 1 (19:18):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (19:18):

… they have been introduced to Australia.

Speaker 1 (19:20):

Oh yeah, of course.

Daniel Motlop (19:21):

And they’re running wild out there in, through the central desert, um, up through the Northern Territory, um, and they’re a pest. So, um, to be able to eat more of that for sustainability and, you know, not eat your cattle stuff, all the stuff that gets farmed and that. So, um, we are finding a bit more of a trend, I suppose, in our shop where people are actually going down that line of, we wanna become more sustainable-

Speaker 1 (19:41):

Mm-hmm. Absolutely.

Daniel Motlop (19:43):

And that’s, as far as, you know, using plastic bags as well, and, uh, paper bags, people bringing their own, um, lunch boxes in, they put the meat in rather than, um, using plastic bags. So, yeah. We’re, uh, th-

Speaker 1 (19:55):

I assume that that is more the future.

Daniel Motlop (19:57):

Yes. Yeah. We ho- we hope so. So…

Speaker 1 (19:59):

Yeah. Um, sorry. I have to introduce someone that, uh, today’s helping us. Come on, come over here. Have been checking the camera. He was checking the camera for us, and you can say hi to everyone. They’re gonna see you. My son, Francis, been helping today a little bit. Can you please go back now and check if the camera’s running, (laughing) because if it’s not running, I’m brewing.

Daniel Motlop (20:23):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (20:23):

Okay. And, um, so the, well, there’s so many things that, uh, that I’ve seen connecting, um, between the project I’m developing over here and what you are doing. That’s why, when, uh, you agreed to create this, uh, sensory masterclass-

Daniel Motlop (20:45):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (20:45):

… about your product, you actually came out with the answer of a question that I had, which is, how do I use that?

Daniel Motlop (20:52):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (20:52):

I mean, I’m so curious. I, they are there. I know that they are here, they haven’t been imported, so they won’t create any arm to the environment.

Daniel Motlop (21:03):

Mm-hmm.

Speaker 1 (21:03):

Simply, I don’t know how to use them. And, uh, I, fortunately to me, I’m a kind of open mind with food.

Daniel Motlop (21:10):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (21:11):

So, wherever I g- I went, I tried.

Daniel Motlop (21:13):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (21:13):

But sometimes I know the people, they are a little bit, you know, skeptic.

Daniel Motlop (21:17):

Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (21:17):

So, when you said, “I wanna do this experience, this masterclass.” I said, oh my God, I wanna have him on the platform.

Daniel Motlop (21:24):

Yeah. Yep.

Speaker 1 (21:24):

So, and do you… Can you give us a little bit of, you know, uh, the, what will be done during this masterclass? Do we have-

Daniel Motlop (21:32):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (21:32):

… to dance or do we have to do something-

Daniel Motlop (21:35):

No, no, no dancing. Um, basically there’ll be, um, a number of, uh, native ingredients. Um, some that a lot of people have seen before, you know. There, there’s stuff that people have, have seen, but then there’s stuff that people haven’t. So, um, we’ll put a number of native ingredients on the table and, and pretty much, uh, show them on a map where they are from, where they can be harvested. Uh-

Speaker 1 (21:56):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (21:57):

… what area where you can find them, um, around which certain plants. Um, but also we’ll, we’ll teach people how to cook with them. Um, a lot of them are, um, sour in taste, I suppose.

Speaker 1 (22:08):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (22:09):

The plums and the berries and that sort of stuff. But if you can imagine an Aboriginal person’s pa- palate, um, 100 years ago, would’ve been a sweet plum sort of thing. So, um, basically what we try to do at Something Wild is put these native ingredients in commercial products. Like, um, if you’ve seen recently we’ve done our yogurt. Um-

Speaker 1 (22:27):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (22:27):

… uh, so yogurt, we’ve done with Fleurieu Milk, um, the Fleurieu Milk Company just to obviously create jobs. So, basically if I, if I put a native ingredient, um, in a commercial product, um, it can provide jobs back in the Aboriginal community where they harvested a lot of that stuff.

Speaker 1 (22:44):

Absolutely.

Daniel Motlop (22:44):

Um, so the, the Kakadu plum comes outta [inaudible 00:22:47], which is 1,000 kilometers out of Darwin. Um, so we collect that, uh, out of there, um, through the ladies. And then also we also do a Green Ant Gin-

Speaker 1 (22:57):

Yes.

Daniel Motlop (22:58):

… um, which is a very nice drop. So-

Speaker 1 (22:59):

I actually had the opportunity.

Daniel Motlop (23:03):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (23:04):

I interviewed [inaudible 00:23:04]-

Daniel Motlop (23:04):

Oh yeah. Yep.

Speaker 1 (23:04):

… one of the first interview with ade- the Radio Italiana Adelaide.

Daniel Motlop (23:07):

Yeah. He’s an Italian boy too, so, yeah. Um, yeah, so basically trying to make native ingredients, put it on the map, I suppose, is, you know, if, if I can put it in a, uh, already, um, someone’s already, you know, doing a yogurt or stuff like that, and people are gonna try it more and then, you know, kids are gonna try it and stuff like that. So, yeah. Slowly, slowly people are getting to know it, but yeah, basically we’ll put a lot of native ingredients in, and we’ll talk about it. Um, the cultural significance to it-

Speaker 1 (23:38):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (23:38):

… who can pick it, who can’t, who can’t through that system. Um-

Speaker 1 (23:42):

Okay. Couldn’t be… So, just like add an idea, will get a little bit scary the fact that those ingredients, they became commercial to the point that people are starting to do no respect the, the balance that they were speaking before-

Daniel Motlop (23:55):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (23:55):

… just because they wanna make it more.

Daniel Motlop (23:57):

Yep. Yeah. And that’s, that’s where, um… I suppose that’s where I’m tied between, um, you know, culture and business, I suppose.

Speaker 1 (24:04):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (24:04):

Um, so it, it’s, it’s hard to get right. Basically as a company, um, we go to the traditional owners of that land where it’s harvested and we ask, um, if it can be harvested outta that area.

Speaker 1 (24:15):

Hmm.

Daniel Motlop (24:16):

Because obviously they’re gonna look after their trees and that land to the best that they can.

Speaker 1 (24:20):

Hmm.

Daniel Motlop (24:21):

Um, rather than me send someone in there and go and collect it, and then they, you know, they rip trees down or whatever. So-

Speaker 1 (24:28):

Absolutely.

Daniel Motlop (24:29):

… basically we, the onus is, is on the people that need to look after land, and Aboriginal people will look after their land or where they’re harvesting from. Um, so yeah, and the other, the other key factor in our business is we go to government as well for a permit to be able to harvest in certain areas.

Speaker 1 (24:46):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (24:46):

Um, so basically, um, whether it’s, you know, down the beach or on the side of the road, or anything like that, we go to the government and say, look, we want a permit for this area.’Cause that’s where it grows, and we wanna be able to harvest it. Um, because we don’t want in five, 10 years everyone out doing it. Um, we want everyone to have, to have a permit to be able to pick, harvest native ingredients from Australia. Uh-

Speaker 1 (25:08):

You wanna move directly, like, you know, you wanna create legislation to-

Daniel Motlop (25:11):

Yes.

Speaker 1 (25:11):

… to manage these-

Daniel Motlop (25:13):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (25:13):

… before that is gonna be something dangerous for the environment?

Daniel Motlop (25:16):

Yep, yep.

Speaker 1 (25:17):

Which is probably good thing to do.

Daniel Motlop (25:19):

Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (25:19):

At least Australia for what I’ve seen so far, they create-

Daniel Motlop (25:22):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (25:22):

… a good legislation and, and, uh, and that is really good, really good thing. And, uh, I was thinking that, do you think it will be possible to have the experience to go and do an harvest? Because that is-

Daniel Motlop (25:33):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (25:33):

… something you really would like to do?

Daniel Motlop (25:35):

Yeah, yeah, of course. Yeah. It’s, it’s, obviously, um, every now and again, we take chefs up to Darwin-

Speaker 1 (25:40):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (25:41):

… um, and we go harvesting for magpie goose.

Speaker 1 (25:42):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (25:43):

Um, so-

Speaker 1 (25:43):

What, what’s, my sorry. What were these? You have to give us a little bit understanding-

Daniel Motlop (25:47):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (25:47):

… what are these products.

Daniel Motlop (25:48):

Okay. So-

Speaker 1 (25:49):

Because first you pronounce it really quick, the name.

Daniel Motlop (25:51):

Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (25:51):

And for me it’s like, woo, what was that?

Daniel Motlop (25:53):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (25:53):

I haven’t seen it before. I need to have a picture somewhere.

Daniel Motlop (25:56):

Yeah. So, basically, um, we call it gulumoerrgin, which it’s, it’s a, it’s a goose.

Speaker 1 (26:01):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (26:02):

Um, but it’s a black and white goose.

Speaker 1 (26:05):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (26:05):

And it’s native to Australia. Um, and it’s all through the Northern Territory up through Queensland. Um, so basically I’ve been, yeah, hunting magpie goose most of my life with my, with my family?

Speaker 1 (26:17):

Hunting with rifle or?

Daniel Motlop (26:19):

Uh, yeah, with rifle. Yeah. Yep.

Speaker 1 (26:20):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (26:20):

Yep. Yep. So, mainly when we use a spear, nah, nah. No, no.

Speaker 1 (26:23):

Not anymore with the, with the-

Daniel Motlop (26:24):

Uh, when we use a spear, it’s usually with fish. So, fishing-

Speaker 1 (26:27):

Okay (laughs)

Daniel Motlop (26:27):

… fishing side. So, but, um, yeah. Magpie goose obviously is, um, a very big, uh, food source for Aboriginal people-

Speaker 1 (26:35):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (26:35):

… um, mainly during, uh, October period to February.

Speaker 1 (26:40):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (26:40):

Um, basically there’s a system on when you harvest it. So, it’s not just a matter of going out and, um, getting the magpie goose all year round. Um, they, they pretty much tell you when they’re ready to be harvested.

Speaker 1 (26:53):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (26:53):

Um, and that’s when they’re nice and juicy, and fat and ready to eat.

Speaker 1 (26:57):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (26:58):

Um, so they go out during June, July, August, they go out and si- nest. So, basically they’re reproducing, um, which means we’re-

Speaker 1 (27:07):

Not-

Daniel Motlop (27:07):

… not allowed to-

Speaker 1 (27:07):

Not touch obviously.

Daniel Motlop (27:08):

… touching it.

Speaker 1 (27:09):

Absolutely.

Daniel Motlop (27:09):

Um, and they don’t taste as good. They taste good when they come back around. So-

Speaker 1 (27:15):

After.

Daniel Motlop (27:15):

So, yeah. So, there is a system in everything that Aboriginal people do, I suppose.

Speaker 1 (27:20):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (27:20):

Um, and that’s saying when you can harvest stuff, um, and when you can’t. Um, for the only reason is sustainability-

Speaker 1 (27:27):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (27:27):

… and, and treating everything with respect, I suppose. So…

Speaker 1 (27:32):

Mm-hmm. And also the, like the, the, the experience, it, becames more, um, a sort of spiritual experience to, to do that. And then you give this value to a product is not connected-

Daniel Motlop (27:44):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (27:44):

… with the value of money, it’s connected with the, with experience. Is actually is why I’m so focused on trying to bring experiences.

Daniel Motlop (27:52):

Yep. Yep.

Speaker 1 (27:53):

Because like, uh, my mother in Bulgaria, the way how she’s doing, uh, agriculture, how she’s growing animals, like she collect, uh, animals from, um, a market-

Daniel Motlop (28:04):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (28:04):

… um, 12 years ago.

Daniel Motlop (28:07):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (28:07):

And, uh, she, uh, wanted to have this animal growing healthy, but more, uh, the, the animals they were growing and they were dying really quickly-

Daniel Motlop (28:17):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (28:17):

… because she was not giving any antibiotics and she-

Daniel Motlop (28:20):

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (28:20):

… she was just simply living them where they were having to be and the animals-

Daniel Motlop (28:25):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (28:25):

… they were dying.

Daniel Motlop (28:26):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (28:26):

And we were worried because obviously, you know, the first year we had, uh, 80% of loss.

Daniel Motlop (28:32):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (28:33):

And you think an animal should be able to stand on his own, right?

Daniel Motlop (28:36):

Yep. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (28:37):

And they were not. And, uh, so we had to contact different, you know, aviary centers like in Italy where they can tell you what can be the problem. And from that, we had the answer was that, these, those animals, they were not designed to be grown in a normal state.

Daniel Motlop (28:55):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (28:56):

So, they were designed to be grown in a factory or in a farm, but is designed to be a factory. So, that was the point when which we got super scared because we thought, if this, like, let’s say that we can’t be able to access a farm for the next 10 years.

Daniel Motlop (29:15):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (29:16):

These animals, they are all gone.

Daniel Motlop (29:17):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (29:18):

So, we-

Daniel Motlop (29:18):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (29:18):

So, and then he talked to my mom like, uh, 80 years time to clear these animals-

Daniel Motlop (29:25):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (29:25):

… from their mistakes in, uh, the, in the, in the DNA.

Daniel Motlop (29:30):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (29:30):

And now they are healthy.

Daniel Motlop (29:32):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (29:32):

We have 90% of them. And I hear you say, you understand when they are ready.

Daniel Motlop (29:38):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (29:38):

Often they are not. So, it also became-

Daniel Motlop (29:41):

Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (29:41):

… a sort of respect with-

Daniel Motlop (29:42):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (29:42):

… the animal when you a- when you approach the animal, you understand if it’s the moment. Sometimes you think, no, it’s not the moment for this animal-

Daniel Motlop (29:48):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (29:48):

… and, uh, you don’t wanna go on. And, um-

Daniel Motlop (29:51):

Well, lot of, through our culture, a lot of, there’s a lot of signs including flowers, um, that pop up that tell you when turtle eggs are ready, um, or when turtles can be harvested.

Speaker 1 (30:03):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (30:04):

So, there’s, there’s certain little things that the environment show, uh, Aboriginal people on when they can do something pretty much. So…

Speaker 1 (30:11):

So, you speak with the land and the land tells you-

Daniel Motlop (30:13):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (30:13):

… when you have to move?

Daniel Motlop (30:15):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (30:15):

Which is actually, uh, another thing that they… Um, like I had opportunity to, to, to, to visit, uh, Uluru-

Daniel Motlop (30:25):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (30:25):

… um, in 2009. And, uh, when I went over there, the first thing I found it, uh, a magic place.

Daniel Motlop (30:31):

Mm-hmm.

Speaker 1 (30:35):

And maybe because the soil, maybe because you have the big rock in the middle, and then you have around this. But also it was full of small little spot around it-

Daniel Motlop (30:46):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (30:46):

… which were making it magic.

Daniel Motlop (30:48):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (30:48):

Like, and I remember that, uh, I don’t know if you, if… I don’t know if it’s still possible climb it or not.

Daniel Motlop (30:54):

Uh, not anymore. No.

Speaker 1 (30:54):

That’s good.

Daniel Motlop (30:55):

Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (30:55):

Because when I went over there, I realized, that why you have to go on the top of it, one, the beauty of it, it’s around it.

Daniel Motlop (31:03):

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (31:03):

Like, and, and then-

Daniel Motlop (31:04):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (31:05):

… you can, you can understand a lot about the, the, the, how the culture has been developing here. Because when I was over there, I had in front this big rock. And then I turned myself and I’ve seen the red soil, the green line-

Daniel Motlop (31:21):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (31:21):

… and the blue sky.

Daniel Motlop (31:23):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (31:23):

Where do you have to go? I mean, it’s not like as European that you have the pickup monthly over there. So, you’re constantly fighting to get on the top and going on down.

Daniel Motlop (31:32):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (31:32):

Over there, there is no point to rational.

Daniel Motlop (31:34):

No, no.

Speaker 1 (31:35):

It’s all there.

Daniel Motlop (31:36):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (31:36):

So, you go in one direction, you find what you have to do on the way, and that is the life.

Daniel Motlop (31:40):

Yep. Yeah. It is, it’s a, it’s a beautiful, sacred place. And it’s, it’s very sacred to the Aboriginal people of that area as well. So, to, to finally have stopped them… They’ve won their fight to stop people from climbing it. Um, I think, yeah, there’s a lot of very happy people through that area-

Speaker 1 (31:58):

Yeah.

Daniel Motlop (31:58):

… I suppose. So…

Speaker 1 (31:59):

Finally. And I don’t know. And like seeing the rock and I thought I understood why it was so important.

Daniel Motlop (32:05):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (32:06):

The only place you can see in, you know, 100 kilometers-

Daniel Motlop (32:09):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (32:09):

… under the-

Daniel Motlop (32:09):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (32:10):

And then when you get over there in the morning, you have the water, the condensation coming-

Daniel Motlop (32:15):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (32:15):

… down from the rock. So, there, the rocks is life-

Daniel Motlop (32:18):

Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (32:18):

… is mother.

Daniel Motlop (32:19):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (32:20):

So, I was so, I wa- I was so happy about the visit I’ve done, but also all the countryside. Like, to me, Australia is amazing because of countryside.

Daniel Motlop (32:28):

Yeah. And there’s, uh, the other big rock on the other side as well of it, as well as-

Speaker 1 (32:31):

Yeah. I think I’ve seen it-

Daniel Motlop (32:32):

Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (32:32):

… when I was driving up-

Daniel Motlop (32:34):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (32:34):

… but I never been visiting.

Daniel Motlop (32:35):

Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1 (32:36):

It will be something that’s-

Daniel Motlop (32:36):

So, tho- those two pieces. So, if you talk about the Yirritja, Dhua thing that I spoke about earlier.

Speaker 1 (32:41):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (32:42):

… in that country, that’s the opposite to their-

Speaker 1 (32:45):

Could you please-

Daniel Motlop (32:46):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (32:46):

… uh, like, uh, do you have a, the way of define Yirritja and?

Daniel Motlop (32:50):

Dhua.

Speaker 1 (32:54):

Dhua in English?

Daniel Motlop (32:55):

In and young.

Speaker 1 (32:56):

In and young. Okay. We made it easy.

Daniel Motlop (32:59):

Yes.

Speaker 1 (32:59):

Perfect. Okay. So-

Daniel Motlop (33:00):

In and young. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (33:01):

Now I can connect it-

Daniel Motlop (33:02):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (33:02):

… and now we can keep-

Daniel Motlop (33:03):

Yes.

Speaker 1 (33:03):

… speaking about that. Love it. Absolutely. So, it’s a, it is a good philosophy. Well, what could we do to the people that’s following us? Because so far we’ve been having a good chat. Um, what do you, where would you like to go? Like, what do you think is the goal that… What your, your mission?

Daniel Motlop (33:22):

I suppose, I suppose, just to showcase Aboriginal culture of what it is. It’s such a beautiful culture. Um, but it’s been, I suppose, through past governments and, and settlement and all that sort of stuff, it’s probably been hidden a bit.

Speaker 1 (33:36):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (33:37):

Um-

Speaker 1 (33:37):

Yes, it is.

Daniel Motlop (33:38):

You know, and I mean, we got a beautiful culture where we’re from. Um, but it just probably doe- some doesn’t get showcased enough about-

Speaker 1 (33:46):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (33:47):

… how beautiful it is. So, I’ve got a chance as a businessman to be able to, um, showcase, you know, native ingredients and, and put it on the map, I suppose. And, um, that’s, that’s probably my vision just to get it all out there, I suppose, and make it the norm. So…

Speaker 1 (34:03):

So, uh, for people that’s coming in a central market, actually in Adelaide where the shop is located.

Daniel Motlop (34:10):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (34:10):

And, um, they will have opportunity to access, obviously the, uh, Aboriginal ingredients-

Daniel Motlop (34:17):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (34:17):

… of food-

Daniel Motlop (34:18):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (34:18):

… and then maybe do the spendings too.

Daniel Motlop (34:20):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (34:20):

Uh, do they also-

Daniel Motlop (34:22):

We’ve got a bar as well, that, where we do native cocktails as well.

Speaker 1 (34:25):

Oh, okay. Perfect.

Daniel Motlop (34:26):

Uh, so we sell our Green Ant Gin there. Um, so we, yeah. We’ll look to make a, um, a lot more different alcohol brands as well.

Speaker 1 (34:34):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (34:35):

Um, so things like, um, [inaudible 00:34:38] than that, and, you know-

Speaker 1 (34:39):

A little bit of Italian and-

Daniel Motlop (34:41):

[inaudible 00:34:41] stuff, you know, so, um, but use native ingredients to, to copy those things as well. So-

Speaker 1 (34:45):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (34:46):

… that’s basically where, where, um, you know, the native ingredients are going. Um-

Speaker 1 (34:51):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (34:51):

… so, yeah.

Speaker 1 (34:52):

And is there a chance for people coming also to connect in other ways to the shop? Like the shop could be the gate of the culture, like over there, you could say there is… What’s happening? Uh, it’s the printer that is speaking. Uh, the, the, the, the swap. People going to the shop, they can, uh, maybe find a way to, you know, find Aboriginal festival-

Daniel Motlop (35:19):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (35:19):

… or, so, like, are you gonna, uh, thinking to do this kind of, so like connect the Aboriginal culture, like you have music events or things like that?

Daniel Motlop (35:27):

Um, oh, we, we do. Um, we do dinners every now and again, stuff like that.

Speaker 1 (35:31):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (35:31):

Um, but basically we, yeah, we just a shop of, you know, native game, native green.

Speaker 1 (35:37):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (35:37):

Um, so yeah. Sell all those products, but then also sell, you know, your herbal teas-

Speaker 1 (35:41):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (35:41):

… native teas, um, but also native, the, the green side that are harvested fresh every day.

Speaker 1 (35:47):

Mm-hmm.

Daniel Motlop (35:47):

So, we try to be like a normal fruit and veg, and-

Speaker 1 (35:49):

Yeah.

Daniel Motlop (35:50):

… and have normal, um, native greens in, in there as well. So, just to put it, put it on the map a bit more. Um, but yeah, it’s, it’s basically your, your chance to come into the market and, and try some native ingredients, and-

Speaker 1 (36:05):

Absolutely.

Daniel Motlop (36:05):

… um, then maybe head to, um, somewhere and try, try some food or something like that, so that has native ingredients in it. So, yeah.

Speaker 1 (36:15):

Okay. So I think that, um, I’m really curious to come again. Like, uh, we’re gonna probably organize the first, uh, or the second, um, uh, experience-

Daniel Motlop (36:27):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (36:27):

… and, uh, with the AgriAdventures meet-up group-

Daniel Motlop (36:30):

Yep.

Speaker 1 (36:30):

… over there, so we can come and never look and experience. And obviously see more about the, the experience itself. In the meantime, I really, uh, thank you to come over-

Daniel Motlop (36:40):

Yep. Thank you for having me.

Speaker 1 (36:41):

… sharing-

Daniel Motlop (36:42):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (36:42):

… and, um, I will see you again. And so thank you very much for who have been following us on YouTube channel, and you’ll find, uh, uh, the information about, uh, the website because, uh, you are also, you are also having a website, so people-

Daniel Motlop (36:58):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (36:59):

… will be able to buy some of the products online.

Daniel Motlop (37:01):

Yeah. Something Wild Australia. Yep.

Speaker 1 (37:03):

Okay.

Daniel Motlop (37:03):

www.somethingwildaustralia.

Speaker 1 (37:05):

Perfect. So, you can find the link below, or you can see, you know, the subtitles. And, uh, you can see the adventures on AgriAdventures-

Daniel Motlop (37:13):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (37:14):

… which is agriadventures.com.au. And, um, if you’re coming in Australia soon, just come and see-

Daniel Motlop (37:22):

Yeah.

Speaker 1 (37:22):

… Daniel or-

Daniel Motlop (37:23):

Yep. Or go to Adelaide Central Markets and we’ll be down there.

Speaker 1 (37:26):

And, UH, thank you very much for following us. And, uh, for the people that’s following us from the Radio Italiana Adelaide, I can switch back to the Italian (laughs).

Daniel Motlop (37:34):

Yep. Yep.

Speaker 1 (37:34):

So we can. So, um, [foreign language 00:37:48]. Thank you.

Daniel Motlop (37:48):

Thank you. (laughs) Ciao.

Speaker 1 (38:26):

[foreign language 00:38:26]

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